Thursday, May 12, 2011

Colorful Birds

I was able to spend a short time at George Rogers Clark Park….was able to see Northern Parula, Blue Headed Vireo, and Indigo Bunting.
northern-parula_1348-2a
indigo_1323

Colorful Birds

I was able to spend a short time at George Rogers Clark Park….was able to see Northern Parula, Blue Headed Vireo, and Indigo Bunting.
northern-parula_1348-2a
indigo_1323

Wednesday, May 11, 2011

Magee Warblers

We made our annual visit to the Magee Marsh/Crane Creek area just east of Toledo last week. As usual, the boardwalks were often packed, and birders and bird photographers lined up to see the spring migration along the Lake Erie shoreline.
Although the predicted fallout never materialized, there were still plenty of birds to go around and fill up memory cards.
This year, I spent a good deal of time photographing from the observation deck at the boardwalk main entrance. Not only did it help to lessen the impact of the crowds, but the backgrounds are cleaner and the light better.
I’ll be posting some of my favorite shots, including this American Redstart:

Magee Warblers

We made our annual visit to the Magee Marsh/Crane Creek area just east of Toledo last week. As usual, the boardwalks were often packed, and birders and bird photographers lined up to see the spring migration along the Lake Erie shoreline.
Although the predicted fallout never materialized, there were still plenty of birds to go around and fill up memory cards.
This year, I spent a good deal of time photographing from the observation deck at the boardwalk main entrance. Not only did it help to lessen the impact of the crowds, but the backgrounds are cleaner and the light better.
I’ll be posting some of my favorite shots, including this American Redstart:

Yellowstone Wildlife

Here’s a little video of some of our favorite Yellowstone images…..





Yellowstone Wildlife

Here’s a little video of some of our favorite Yellowstone images…..





Saturday, May 7, 2011

Kirtland's Warbler


A few days ago, birders began reporting a Kirtland’s warbler at 960 Kinnear Rd in Columbus. When I checked the address and street view in Google Maps, I saw that this was a business; and located in the midst of the OSU campus traffic.


Needless to say, I wasn’t wanting to use valuable gasoline and time to head to Columbus (about 40 miles) only to find that the bird had continues north to it’s breeding grounds in Michigan.
On the third day that the bird was sighted at the same location, I couldn’t resist and talked hubby into a road trip.
For those who don’t know, the Kirtland’s Warbler is a rare bird. Here are some facts:
The Kirtlands warbler was discovered along the Au Sable River in 1903.
It spends the winter in the Bahamas. It flies 1,100 miles one-way, twice a year.
During the 2010 annual census, a total of 1,773 singing males were counted, a decrease from 1,826 in 2009.
The total count included 1,747 from Michigan with an additional 23 males observed in Wisconsin, and 3 males observed in Ontario, Canada.
The Kirtlands warbler was one of the first species to be listed on the Endangered Species List when it was enacted by Congress in 1973.


When we arrived, there were several birders observing the bird, who was in the tree (above the blue car in the photo) happily hoping about consuming seed pods. I was able to snap several images; even though directly under him, cars and trucks continually passed….with may curious questions as to what we were looking at. An emergency vehicle even passed under him, with sirens full blast….yet he stayed put and kept up with his feast.
Here are a few of my favorite images:

Kirtland's Warbler


A few days ago, birders began reporting a Kirtland’s warbler at 960 Kinnear Rd in Columbus. When I checked the address and street view in Google Maps, I saw that this was a business; and located in the midst of the OSU campus traffic.


Needless to say, I wasn’t wanting to use valuable gasoline and time to head to Columbus (about 40 miles) only to find that the bird had continues north to it’s breeding grounds in Michigan.
On the third day that the bird was sighted at the same location, I couldn’t resist and talked hubby into a road trip.
For those who don’t know, the Kirtland’s Warbler is a rare bird. Here are some facts:
The Kirtlands warbler was discovered along the Au Sable River in 1903.
It spends the winter in the Bahamas. It flies 1,100 miles one-way, twice a year.
During the 2010 annual census, a total of 1,773 singing males were counted, a decrease from 1,826 in 2009.
The total count included 1,747 from Michigan with an additional 23 males observed in Wisconsin, and 3 males observed in Ontario, Canada.
The Kirtlands warbler was one of the first species to be listed on the Endangered Species List when it was enacted by Congress in 1973.


When we arrived, there were several birders observing the bird, who was in the tree (above the blue car in the photo) happily hoping about consuming seed pods. I was able to snap several images; even though directly under him, cars and trucks continually passed….with may curious questions as to what we were looking at. An emergency vehicle even passed under him, with sirens full blast….yet he stayed put and kept up with his feast.
Here are a few of my favorite images:

Sunday, May 1, 2011

Garganey

The Ohio Birds Listserve was busy with postings about a sighting of a Garganey over the weekend. One of the posts stated that the last Garganey sighting was in 1994. Not having much else to do on a gray Ohio day, we decided to drive down to Harrison County, to the Fernald Preserve.
We were able to view the duck and to get a few images; though the light was poor and he stayed on the far side of the pond. Even so, it was well worth the drive to be able to see this duck!


Garganey

The Ohio Birds Listserve was busy with postings about a sighting of a Garganey over the weekend. One of the posts stated that the last Garganey sighting was in 1994. Not having much else to do on a gray Ohio day, we decided to drive down to Harrison County, to the Fernald Preserve.
We were able to view the duck and to get a few images; though the light was poor and he stayed on the far side of the pond. Even so, it was well worth the drive to be able to see this duck!